4g64 crank...is it different for a manual and automatic? [Archive] - DSM Forums: Mitsubishi Eclipse, Plymouth Laser, and Eagle Talon Forum: DSMtalk.com

: 4g64 crank...is it different for a manual and automatic?


Dr0n3
05-04-2009, 11:26 AM
I bought a 4g64 out of a 1996 galant for my 97 spyder gs. The mechanic doing the work just told me that the crank on the galant motor is completely different from what is suppose to fit my car. The galant was an automatic and I have a 5-speed. He said if we find a 5-speed galant motor it will work. Is there any other way to do this and are his statements even correct?

kronus
05-04-2009, 11:34 AM
I don't know if the 2g's are like the 1g's but auto and manual transmissions have different starter plates and also automatics don't have the flywheel alignment dowel on the crank that manual's do. Other than that, they ought to be the same. A 7-bolt 4g64 ought to be the same throughout the models. Unless the Galant has the orientation flipped. Then you'll just need to swap your DSM head onto the Galant block.

Dr0n3
05-04-2009, 12:49 PM
Spyder4g64t off this forum has done a galant to spyder swap twice and I consulted with him before attempting this. I havent taken a look at anything yet, but from this point i was told I need to buy a crank kit to solve this problem. I do not agree with this statement and I'm trying to prove my mechanic is full of shit. What all needs to be done to this 4g64 galant motor in order to make the crank fit my 5-speed transmission?

MidShipCivic
05-04-2009, 01:05 PM
The crankshaft is not different, there is a large metal bushing on the crankshaft flange for automatics that is easily removed with a puller.

calgst95
07-12-2009, 04:07 PM
Im trying to remove that metal bushing on the auto crank as well, but I have no luck- can someone point me to the proper tool to use? What kind of puller can I use? This little metal bushing is the only thing stopping me from finishing my car!! Any help is appreciated!

Spyder4G64T
07-13-2009, 07:56 AM
A little trick I learned elsewhere... Fill the inside of the bushing with rag scraps soaked in oil, and then find something about the right diameter to fit in that hole. I believe I used a 1/2" socket extension. Hammer on whatever you found to fit inside. The hydraulic pressure from the oil will push out the bushing from the back side.

I spent hours on mine, trying to get it out, until I found that trick. Then it came out in like 5 minutes.

bkrathwohl
07-13-2009, 08:16 AM
A little trick I learned elsewhere... Fill the inside of the bushing with rag scraps soaked in oil, and then find something about the right diameter to fit in that hole. I believe I used a 1/2" socket extension. Hammer on whatever you found to fit inside. The hydraulic pressure from the oil will push out the bushing from the back side.


Good to know

awdrocks
06-01-2010, 09:07 AM
I know this is an old thread but seems to be the proper place to post my question.

I'm looking to do a 4g64 6 bolt block and crank on my 92' awd AUTO. Do I need to worry if I get my doner from an auto or manual? Looking for a 89-91 Sonata doner.

awdrocks
06-01-2010, 09:43 AM
[QUOTE=kronus;2120088]1g's auto and manual transmissions have different starter plates and also automatics don't have the flywheel alignment dowel on the crank that manual's do.QUOTE]

From what I understand is that the starter on the tranny are different from auto to manuals, BUT the 4G64 block will not have any issues whether you have an auto or a manual right? Or than the dowel on the manual crank that can just be taken off to use in an auto?

Spyder4G64T
06-01-2010, 10:15 AM
The block / crank are the same. The auto comes with a bushing in the end of the crank. When you put an auto into a manual tranny car, you need to pull that bushing out. Other than that, you'll be fine.

awdrocks
06-01-2010, 10:20 AM
Awesome. Thanks. I just found a 1989 Sonata long block for $500. Buying it.

awdrocks
06-02-2010, 05:57 PM
Doing some research and im not coming up with anything. Does anyone know the rod ratio to a 2.3L (4G63) and the rod ratio to the 4G64? Like 1.6 ect.

LSR Mike
07-15-2010, 03:50 PM
An engine's rod ratio is just the ratio of the con rod's center to center length compared to it's crank's stroke. Divide the con rod length by the stroke, If you increase the rod length, you increase the rod ratio. On the other end, if you decrease the stroke, you will also increase the rod ratio. Do the opposite and you decrease the rod ratio.

a stock 4G64 has a stroke of 3.94 in or 100mm the rod length is 5.9 in or 150mm

do the math...and IIRC the only difference between a 2.3 "stroker and a 2.4 is the Bore

2.3= 2.4 crank in a 2.0 Block same rods.