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1G In-Tank Bosch Fuel Pump Installation
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<TABLE width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TH bgColor=#616161>Overview</TH></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
This VFAQ covers the installation of the popular Bosch "044" fuel pump in the stock fuel tank/sending unit of my 1G. The Bosch pump can be installed onto the stock fuel sending unit with modification on 1Gs. I have searched high and low for a VFAQ on this process and never found one. I'm sure there is more than one way to do this, but here is how I did it.

<TABLE width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TH bgColor=#616161>Parts & Tools Needed:</TH></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
Parts needed:
  • Bosch Motorsports Fuel Pump # 0 580 254 044 (I purchased mine from JayRacing for $225)
  • -6AN to 12x1.5mm adapter
  • -6AN union
  • -6AN bulkhead fitting (plus -6AN securing nut if not included)
  • -6AN female to -6AN hose end (90*)
  • -6AN braided SS line
  • -6AN female to -6AN hose end (straight)
  • -6AN male to 3/8" barb adapter
  • -6AN Viton seals for bulkhead fitting
  • 10mm & 8mm nuts
  • ~14GA spade connectors
  • 3/8" hose clamp
All of the fittings can be purchased from any mail order speed shop like Summit or Jegs. You have the option of using -8AN fittings.

Tools required:
  • Bench grinder or angle grinder
  • 19mm & 14mm line wrenches (aka flare nut wrenches) for removing the stock feed line from the sending unit
  • Razor blade or wire cutters
  • Tons of WD-40
  • Hack saw
  • Large drill bits for metal (3/8" and up), cobalt works best
  • Bench vise
  • Hammer
  • AN wrench & crescent wrench
  • Chop saw or Dremel w/ cut-off wheel
  • Knowing how to work with SS line
  • Large shallow & deep sockets (19-21mm)
<TABLE width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TH bgColor=#616161>Step by step Instructions</TH></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
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<TD>I started taking pics late in the game. Refer to the standard fuel pump VFAQ on VFAQ.com for removing the fuel pump. I had a Wablro pump in my car which I have already removed and set aside, as shown here. This sending unit will be modified to fit the Bosch</TD>

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<TD>First, we will cut off the tube that comes out the top of the sending unit. Position the hack saw flush with the top of the unit and be sure not to saw anything but the tube.

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<TD>The tube chopped off.</TD>

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<TD>With a 3/8" drill bit, drill out the hole so that the tube inside the sending unit will fall out.</TD>

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<TD>The inner tube removed.</TD>

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<TD>Find a drill bit that's a tad bigger than the bulkhead fitting and drill out the hole. I didn't have a big enough bit, so I drilled it out with what I had and used a die grinder to open it up a bit.

This is the bulkhead fitting installed. Be sure to put a Viton seal between the fitting and the locking nut. I made the hole just big enough to where the seal fits snugly between it and the fitting. Use the appropriate sockets and tighten the hell out of the locknut.</TD>

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<TD>As you can see, quite a bit of grinding and coaxing is required to get to this point. The idea is to provide enough clearance to where the Bosch can attach to the bulkhead fitting without the sending unit interfering with it. Grind away the sides of the sending unit "tail" and bend it back away from where the pump will be, as shown here.</TD>

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<TD>Fitting the pump to the sending unit. Leave the plastic plug in the inlet (bottom) of the fuel pump while working with it, to prevent any contaminants from getting in. Note the sequence of fittings; from the pump outlet, they go: AN to 12x1.5 adapter (be sure to include the copper washer that comes with the pump), AN union, AN bulkhead fitting.

I bent the sending unit "tail" back towards the pump near the top of it, so that the rest of it tracked with the length of the pump without putting sideways pressure on it. The pump is secured to the sending unti with a standard hose clamp.</TD>

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<TD>Another angle.</TD>

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<TD>Closeup of fittings. Note how I had removed the fuel level device while making the necessary adjustments. It was getting in the way. Take care not to bend the arm of the fuel level device while handling the sending unit.</TD>

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<TD>The completed sending unit next to the old Walbro 255. *UPDATE: JayRacing now offers a filter sock for the inlet of the Bosch pump. It is, of course, optional but good insurance.*</TD>

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<TD>I crimped spade connectors onto the positive and negative wires and added some solder to them. The positive terminal takes the 10mm nut, while the negative terminal takes the 8mm nut.</TD>

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<TD>Another angle.</TD>

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<TD>Yet another. I had to attach the screw for negative wire to ground from the opposite direction as stock, as the pump was in the way when trying to screw it in from the front. I added a dab of blue Loctite to all threads for good measure. Also notice the AN 90* attached to the top of the bulkhead fitting...</TD>

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<TD>...which interferes with the stock cover plate for the sending unit access hole. I remedied this by coaxing the offending area with a hammer. Hard to tell from the pic, but the hammered spot is just above where the large hole is for the wire harness grommet. *UPDATE: After I did this installation, I found a different bulkhead fitting that has the 90* exit built in. This would be a better option as it wouldn't stick up out of the sending unit so much an require clearancing as shown here.*</TD>

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<TD>The sending unit back in place. REMEMBER TO REMOVE THE PLASTIC PLUG FROM THE PUMP INLET BEFORE INSTALLING THE SENDING UNIT! Be sure the wires to the pump do not get caught between the lid of the sending unit and the tank. Here comes the fun part. Cut the metal end off of the stock rubber fuel feed line, seen here with a paper towel stuffed in it. Cut it right at the metal end and no further back. You need all the length you can get out of this rubber line.</TD>

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<TD>This was by far the hardest part of the job. You must get the 3/8" barb fitting ALL THE WAY INTO the rubber hose. The problem is that it's too big to begin with. After grinding the barbs down a bit, lots of twisting and WD-40, I got the fitting sufficiently into the hose for a clamp to fit. It helped to use the appropriate sized socket + ratchet and turning the fitting while pushing it towards the hose. Heating the fitting up just a tad with a torch also helped a bit. Your hand will cramp up as you have to stick it between the chassis and the tank, grab hold of the hose, and apply enough force from both directions for the fitting to go in. This step alone took me an hour!</TD>

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<TD>Once the barb fitting is in the hose, loosely attach the AN hose end adapter to get an idea of how much SS line is needed to bridge the gap between the hose and the fitting coming out of the sending unit. Prepare this line and install it.

This is the completed line with the sending unit secured.</TD>

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<TD>It's time to test the fuel pump (without starting the car!) and check for leaks. If your car/ECU is stock, activate the fuel pump either by using a PocketLOGGER or equivalent device, or by grounding the fuel pump check wire in the engine bay (consult your manual). Let the pump run for several minutes to get it saturated with fuel. While it's running, check the fittings for fuel leaks and address if necessary.

That's it!</TD>

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