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Ok sorry if i sound like an idiot but im new to DSM's......Ok i wanted to swap my blown 97 Gs-T's engine its a 4G63...The thing is people are telling me to get a 1st gen engine and swap that in...exactly what is the difference in the 2 engines....HP, displacement, what type of turbo.........thanx
 

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the 90 and 91 engines are called 6 bolt engines. their cranckshafts have 6 bolts. Afeter 92 they came with 7 bolts.
However the 6 bolt engines are thought to be stronger. The 7 bolts specially the engines on the 2G's are known to get cranckwalk. which is lateral movement of the cranckshaft.
this is not always but a good chunk get infected with the disease


beside that the engines are very close.
The 1G turbos 90-94 are bigger however 2G engines come with higher compression pistons.


See what you can find and do a search
swap of an older engine involves some wiring change which is SIMPLE though. search for MGNUS MOTOR SPORT which does that and have a good explanation on their site



Amin
 

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THere is a little more to it

Well where should I start? I just finished with my conversion into my 95 GSX with an AT. Let me start by saying that anyone that has an AT would be better off just selling the car completely or putting a 7 bolt in because you might get the engine in, but guess what...it won't hook up to the tranny! Neat huh. Anyway, if you do have a manual, then it is merely a matter of mixing and matching the proper timing belt parts to make the happiness happen. Its all documented on RRE and Magnus so check it out and good luck. Hope you don't have an AT...:confused:
 

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HP differences

Hp wise I believe that you are getting more hp out of the conversion if you put combine the 1g head with the higher compression of the 2g pistons. I could not tell you for sure because of all the differences that went in at about the same time on my car. Before my car blew up, my turbo had gone out and I had put a 16g on it and was running 15-16 psi. I only got to drive this for a couple weeks before the engine and tranny went out so to be honest, I did not really get a true feel for the engine. Now, 9 months later, I have finished everything and have been running the engine at 10-11 psi and it feels at least as strong as it did before at the 15-16 psi setting. I also did manifold porting on both sides while everything was out so everything is flowing better aside from all of the stock conversion pieces. Whether this is just reduced blow by on the rings, better compression, whatever I cannot be certain but I do know that it was a lot of work and a very good learning experience.
Again, I emphasize rethinking the conversion if you have the AT though.
 

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Re: THere is a little more to it

hardwyre7 said:
Well where should I start? I just finished with my conversion into my 95 GSX with an AT. Let me start by saying that anyone that has an AT would be better off just selling the car completely or putting a 7 bolt in because you might get the engine in, but guess what...it won't hook up to the tranny! Neat huh. Anyway, if you do have a manual, then it is merely a matter of mixing and matching the proper timing belt parts to make the happiness happen. Its all documented on RRE and Magnus so check it out and good luck. Hope you don't have an AT...:confused:
Why did you go with a 6 bolt. AT almost never crankwalk.
 

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My decision

Well lets start with what actually happened with my car that made it blow up.
I really cannot say that the cause of my engine blowing up, catching on fire, sending two rods completely through my block, snapping one of my balance shafts, while leaving the timing belt in relatively decent shape with only a few teeth shaved off after the whole assembly came to a complete stop from 55 mph was caused by crankwalk but I was guessing thats what it was. After everything was off and I was trying to get the crank out as it sat embedded in my block, I pretty much made an estimated guess that I was one of the big winners of a wonderfully crafted 4g63 w/ an AT that defied the odds. Anyway, after being stranded on top of a mtn pass the day after Christmas at 10 o clock at night I decided that I didn't want to take the chance of having what could or could not have been crankwalk again.
Aside from that, I was able to find some pretty good deals on 1g parts and my good friend had 2 extra blocks, parts for free that I could have. It was still a lot of work to figure everything out and get what I needed but hey, the cost of cruisin in one of the funnest cars around. :cool:
 

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Re: Re: THere is a little more to it

talontsiawd said:

Why did you go with a 6 bolt. AT almost never crankwalk.
Not true. One of the worst cases I ever saw was a 95 A/T GSX.. I could move the crank 1cm laterally BY HAND... with a prybar it could go even further.

It doesn't happen nearly as often as with M/T cars since the clutch accelerates thrust bearing wear, but A/T is known to do it too...
 

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Re: Re: Re: THere is a little more to it

James92TSi said:
Not true. One of the worst cases I ever saw was a 95 A/T GSX.. I could move the crank 1cm laterally BY HAND... with a prybar it could go even further.

It doesn't happen nearly as often as with M/T cars since the clutch accelerates thrust bearing wear, but A/T is known to do it too...
Well, it happens significantly less. Not worth the extra work in my oppinion.
 

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extra work?

Well as far as extra work on the engine side I would have to disagree with you as I did not really think that it was too substantial. A little cutting on the tbelt cover, soldering 3 wires for the CAS, repositioning one vacuum line and that was it I think.
Sure I had the block checked and the crank turned but I would have done that either way. The one thing that did cost me about the whole conversion was having to have the rods machined to the 2g pistons' specs. I think that cost me like 80 bucks or something but worth it to have the big rods in my shortblock!

Now if I knew that I would have had to work as hard as I did to get the flexplate fit, that is a different story!

Anyway, just a little encouragement for all the DIYer's out there who are taking on the conversion...its not that bad!
 
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