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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed that the amount of topics in this place is ballooning much faster than the traffic can comment on them. So here goes another one :)

I just checked out this website: http://www.aerocharger.com/tech1.htm
and found some very interesting concepts on turbochargers. How about a "variable geometry" turbocharger. This is a turbocharger that maximizes exhaust veocity at low flow to dramaticaly improve spool time, and then when then the exhaust flow gets heavy it progressivly opens up to allow maximum flow for high rpm efficiency.

I also found out that mitsubishi heavy industries http://www.mhi.co.jp/gsh/eframe14.htm
mentions this on their web page but does nothing to elaborate on any progress or products they have that utilize this technology.
Could this be the new wave of future turbos?

Just a note to anyone planning on checking out the mitsubishi website - you might get a message asking you to download japanese text support, it is not nessasary, the page is in english. Just close the message box.
(Maybe this is specific to my browser, im not sure)

[This message has been edited by gsxalex (edited August 21, 2000).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oh, and while im on the subject of high tech turbos, does anyone know anything about the titanium/aluminum alloy exhaust turbines that mitsubishi is supposed to be using on the newest lancers? I am particularly interested its performance and the prospects of getting that turbo imported.
 

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i believe chrysler did this first in the 80's on some of the shelby 2.2 turbo's. i'm pretty sure they where garrett turbo's and called the vnt or varible nozzle turbo. you should be able to find info about them by searching some of the 2.2 shelby sites.

bill
 

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check this link out for info on the garrett vnt..http://idt.net/~gdonovan/turbo_vnt.html

it's definitly very intresting...imagine a ts04 that builds 30psi at 2500rpms.........hello garrett!!!

bill
 

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there are MANY reason why this is not on ever car. A few are cost and the other is the limited useablity of it. you have little to no control on boost setting

From that site and a reason why it isn't used at all :

   The engine was not fully loaded onsuch a light vehicle on flat pavement. On a steep incline the boost would rise to over 20 psi as the engine became fully loaded. The solution was to install a conventional wastegate to control boost when the flow range of the VNT was exceeded. This is recommended for all VNT applications.


So just more parts ( MoPar= More parts heheh) to brake. it works just like a regular turbo. The Backpressure thing is not a problem B/C a W/G limits the amount of it. If the pressure were to keep going up so would the boost.

FYI i think it was SCC that used this on a MR2 and to be honest I was not at all impressed. very small units and VERY little flow ability. it nothing more then a T 2 small ( T-25 )

------------------
Bill Marino
NYC DSM
[email protected]
 

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I was searching for VNT, or Variable Nozzle Turbine, and I found this thread with a bit of misinformation at the end. Garrett makes turbos with VNT all they way to their GT-45, which will flow enough to make 600HP.

Perhaps this wasn't true in August2k (which I assume was the date of this thread as a post was edited then, why doesn't this BBS date every post?)

These still look like the turbos of choice, albeit very expensive....

EDIT: Oh fuck, I'm an idiot /me look bottom left corner for date....

VNT = Variable Nozzle Turbine, sorry I had it wrong

[Edited by shadow on 03-26-2001 at 01:13 PM]
 

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I work with a guy that designs jet turbine engines for Pratt and Whitney. He was just describing this very technology to me the other day. It is used pretty often it seems in the jet turbine industry. He seemed disappointed when I told him I didn't have a variable geometry turbocharger in my talon. :)
 

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greenstreak said:
I work with a guy that designs jet turbine engines for Pratt and Whitney. He was just describing this very technology to me the other day. It is used pretty often it seems in the jet turbine industry. He seemed disappointed when I told him I didn't have a variable geometry turbocharger in my talon. :)
Quiet you!! You and your damn crazy tea-cup driving car!
 

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Yeah, VNTs aren't really a new development. I'd like to see them come into more use though. Although like Rdy2race says, there is the MPTB rule, but if they are commonly used on jet turbines and achieve good reliability, it shouldn't be too much of a problem. Heck, I'm sure there are people out there who thinks that a turbo also falls under MPTB too, but look at how far we've come.

What looked pretty interesting, that I saw from SCC a while back, was the hydracharger. Though it's probably more of a supercharger than a turbocharger, being that the exhaust gases aren't used to drive the fluid. For those who didn't read that article, it is basically a compressor section coupled to a FLUID driven turbine section. Fluid is run via a waterpump, which can be overdriven at slow engine speeds to provide usable boost off line. Pretty cool.
 
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