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Discussion Starter #1
O.K. I thought it might be neat to have a trivia question for all of the DSM audiophiles on this board. If you don't want to participate, please don't flame me; just don't reply.

The question is:

Everybody knows that every major aftermarket radio manufacturer has switched their wiring code to the original Clarion colors. All of the wiring adapters now have the same colors for the same functions. Makes it easy, right? Well, here's the question-------- Who can name the two wires and their functions that have completely switched their identity one for the other when wiring an old school Pioneer to a new Clarion code wiring harness?

Whomever wins gets 3 smiley faces!
All guesses are welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Name the functions, and you may win!!!
 

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orange is illumination and yellow is constant power

orange with a black stripe is dimmer.

car stereo OWNZ JOo
 

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Discussion Starter #5
:) :) :)

That was fast!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
O.K., here it is:

Everybody knows that there are many different ways to rate an amplifier's power. There is a matematical expression used in electronics to describe the average level of a signal. It is called RMS. RMS is particularly useful in describing the energy of a complex waveform or sine wave and is a convenient way to rate an amplifier's maximum amount of undistorted power. For a complex waveform such as music, RMS is not the peak level, nor the average, but rather it is obtained by squaring all the instantaneous voltages along the waveform, averaging the squared values, and taking the square root of that number. For a single frequency sine wave, the peak voltage value can be multiplied by 0.707 to derive the RMS value of that wave. The RMS value of a signal correlates well with the real work being done by the amplifier. The question is---------

Who can tell me what RMS is an abbreviation for?

Two smiles, and a wink is the prize!
 

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It stands for Root Means Squared which is approximately Radical(3) / 2 or something like that times the max power rating.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Judges??? They've decided to give that one to you even though there is no "s" after the word "mean". The correct answer is ROOT MEAN SQUARED.

Very good! Here is your prize--- :) :) ;)

Do you guys want another one?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As you know, a good effecient loudspeaker is definately a product of good design. A good indication of a speaker's efficiency is indicated by it's sensitivity rating. The sensitivity of speakers is measured by driving the speaker with one watt of power, and measuring the sound pressure level (SPL) at a distance of one meter. This resulting SPL number is the sensitivity rating for any given speaker. A highly efficient speaker results in the following benefits:
1. Lower power requirements resulting in increased headroom. This allows greater peak power with reduced distortion.
2. Using a given amplifier with a more highly efficient system means the amplifier does not work as hard.
3. Requiring less power for a given loudness can result in a savings in amplification costs.
If we take a speaker with an 89 DB sensitivity rating (1 watt @ 1 meter), and feed it with 125 watts, our peak listening level will be 110 DB. The question is this--------- How much power would we have to feed that same speaker in order to achieve a peak listening level of 115 DB?

All guesses are welcome, and the prize this time is a Rudolph!
 

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okay heres a math one its not audio but im sure someone knows the answer ;) , its difficult from my trig homework, i need help so lets so who can do it,

For several hundred years, astronmers hav ekept track of the number of solar flares, or "sunspots" which occur on the surface of the Sun. The number of sunspots counted in a given year varies periodically from a minimum of about 10 per year to a mazimum of about 110 per year. Between the maximums that occured in the year 1750 and 1948, there were 18 complete cycles.
A.) what is the period of the sunspot cycle
B.) assume that the number of sunspots counted in a year varies sinusoidally with the year. Sketch a grap of the sunspot cycles, starting in 9148

anyone wanna give it a shot :p

peace
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry, Turboclown, that is incorrect!
 

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alanseijas said:
Sorry, Turboclown, that is incorrect!
lmao, i like the reply he gave you :D
 

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TurboEclipseGSX said:
okay heres a math one its not audio but im sure someone knows the answer ;) , its difficult from my trig homework, i need help so lets so who can do it,

For several hundred years, astronmers hav ekept track of the number of solar flares, or "sunspots" which occur on the surface of the Sun. The number of sunspots counted in a given year varies periodically from a minimum of about 10 per year to a mazimum of about 110 per year. Between the maximums that occured in the year 1750 and 1948, there were 18 complete cycles.
A.) what is the period of the sunspot cycle
B.) assume that the number of sunspots counted in a year varies sinusoidally with the year. Sketch a grap of the sunspot cycles, starting in 9148

anyone wanna give it a shot :p

peace
a: 11 years by cycle ?
 

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vcarriere said:


a: 11 years by cycle ?
holy shit thats right, you did all that stupid math? man this stuff is to boring for me ;) thanks!!

peace
 

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Discussion Starter #20
vcarriere said:
154.5 watts ??
Thanks for guessing, but that too is incorrect. (try higher!)

BTW, wow on the whole sunspot thing!
 
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