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Here is my cooling system tech. I'm no master, but I think I know enough to help.

First, if you guys are in a hot climate you can run less antifreeze. 15% should be enough. Coolant will actually reduce the cooling systems effectiveness. Water has far superior heat absorbtion and transferring capabilities to coolant.
If your running the green stuff, get rid of it. Most traditional antifreeze has phosphates and silicates mixed into it. What's the big deal you ask? Silicate is basically sand. How about sandblasting your water pump and the seals everytime you run your car? Not only that, but having little particals smashing around into everything also creates friction. It may not be much friction, but if you were close to overheating, it would probably be enough to set you over the top. Get the "non-silicate/phosphate" stuff, it'll say it on the bottle, i think Zerex sells it.

Next, use distilled water. Tap water has all kinds of minerals and other stuff in it. The worst thing about the minerals is that they will be deposited on the radiater and throughout the system. This will reduce the coolant contact with the engine and radiator, which inturn will reduce its effectiveness significantly. In addition, these particals will again be smashing around in there causing friction.

If you have been using silicate antifreeze and tap water in your car for any length of time there are already lots of deposits in your system. Simply changing fluids won't do much good at this point. Flush your system!!! I used zerex superflush i think it was called. You could probably save money and use tap water while doing the flush. I used distilled.
Anyways flush out all the old stuff first, then add the flushing solution and water and run the engine for a while (i drove around all night). When you drain it you will see all the crap that has been clogging up the system. I literally had a large amount of what looked like sand at the bottom of my drainpan. I kept repeating this process until i didn't get "sand" anymore. Then i flushed the system with distilled water until it came out clear.

Some may say all that is overkill. Let them say what they will.

Anyways, the final thing to do is use "water wetter". I only know of redline water wetter. This will increase the water and coolants ability to transfer heat by a significant amount. It will also help prevent corrosion of the metal in the system. aka your radiater lasts longer.

You could also go with a colder thermostat, which i've heard isn't a good thing. I use a 180 degree one with no problem. Actually i want to go to a 170. I've heard that a 10 degree drop in underhood temp equates to 7% hp gain. Plus a cooler block and head would reduce detonation.

And that is all i know.
Hope i helped someone out there.
 

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Thanks Alex. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>You could also go with a colder thermostat, which i've heard isn't a good thing.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Why is it not a good thing?

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** Ted-95 GSX **
 

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Gsxalex, what bad did you hear about using a lower temp thermostat? I would like to find out, For summer time I drive with no thermostat :D and always stay just a line below normal temp, I've had a very bad knock problem (Led Indicator) until I've removed the thermostat :) I've heard that at higher RPM's it possible for coolant to pass through the radiator to fast and giving it to little time to transfer heat (cool off) but that isn't the case on my Tsi :) Only bad part is the time that it takes for the engine to reach "safe boosting :D" temp, also, my theory is that slower the engine heats up - easier it is on it's components, :)


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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by WhoaTed:
Thanks Alex. Why is it not a good thing?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


If you have stock engine management (stock ECU) the car stays in "Warm up mode" and uses a lot more fuel, runs pig rich and other things wich hurt performance. You could probably fool the ECU with a simple in line variable resister tuned by using the data logger to look at actual temperature, and then adjusting the variable resister untill it says 200F on the data logger.

Also, our stock T-state is a high flow unit, most of the lower temperature ones I have seen have a substantially SMALLER flow passage than the stock one.

Later,

Keith
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What i heard is basicaly what keith just said. I don't know how significant the problem is, but i've heard its there.

I've heard of guys running 170 and even 160 degree thermostates with good results like less knock and higher hp.
 

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Some more for the mix?
Antifreeze/coolant should be added at 50/50 mix. If you should up the ratio of coolant, even by accident, you will run hotter. Unless you live in the Arctic, where you would want a mix more antifreeze biased. For summer driving, the coolant part of it resists boiling much better than water. Cooling systems cannot move steam! At 190F by the time your thermostat opens, the water in the system is real close to boiling. Especially at altitude! I run uphill quite a bit here, so I installed a 180F hi-flow lifetime guarantee thermostat.(@ Autozone)
I too, read that the ecu could read cool and try to keep it rich. At this point in my mods I figure this is better than running hotter... :D

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'91 Talon Tsi AWD
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>
For summer driving, the coolant part of it resists boiling much better than water. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It is true that coolant will raise the boiling point of water, however with less coolant your system will be able to remove heat from the engine much more effectivley. In otherwords your car will run cooler and the risk of the water boiling is much less.
Conversly, more coolant in your system will be less effective at removing heat from your engine, leaving it hotter, and will not transfer that heat into the radiator as well which will raise the temp of the coolant and water to a point where you will need a higher boiling point.

IMO i would rather have my system be able to remove heat faster, and thus remain cool enough that i don't need to worry about boiling. Remember, those fans attached to your radiator do turn on when you get close to the boiling point. And the only time that would occur would be if your car was standing in idle.
FYI i do run about 10% coolant so i will have a higher boiling point and lowered freezing point than water alone. If it was winter in WI i would definetly need to run more antifreeze, but i'm moving to socal so i wont need to worry about that.
 
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