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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had the below circled hose blow out, and now its the beginning of July and my A/C doesnt work. Has anyone replaced this hose? I talked to a local DSM shop about replacing this and they stated it was a $150 hose, yada yada yada, about $400 after its all said and done.

Anyways, I was wondering if this was a doable job or if anyone could give me some help on fixing it.



Thanks,
Dustin
 

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Changing the hose shouldn't be to hard, but You have to vacuum and recharge your system after the replacement.
 

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Yeah, you are supposed to discharge the system before you brake any lines free so the freon doesnt not enter the atmosphere. Either way, there is one bolt that holds on the line on the compressor, and one on the other end that holds it to the condenser.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Yeah, no need to worry about discharging the system!

Well, 2 bolts sure sounds easy... which means I am sure it has to be more difficult than that.

Anyone know exactly what that hose is called?

EDIT: N/M, thanks Dustin.... and you said you werent any help? I forget the FSM is available. Its the discharge hose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Skywise said:
With a full charge of freon and parts $400 is a fair price. R-12 is expensive, but still the best option. You'll also need a new dryer.
What is a dryer and why do I need a new one now? Is it possible to reuse it?
 

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A dryer (sometimes called a receiver) takes moisture out of the system (water is very bad for a compressor since it doesn't compress). By having the hose bust out, the system has been exposed to air and the dryer will have absorbed a bunch of moisture. If it's been exposed for any length of time, it should be replaced. Not a big deal, but one additional step.

(Once exposed to air, they can't be reused. Sometimes when working on A/C you can plug it with something - maybe saran wrap - but it's a good idea to replace it anyway.)
 

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I think that is the high pressure hose, but I am not sure b/c its been a long time since my DSM has had a/c components. It should say on it, but I think the low pressure line runs next to the fender...which makes that one the high pressure.

I paid $70 for a complete vacuum, charge, and leak test a few years ago for my Integra. I would pick up a line from a junkyard (thats what I did) and just make sure that the car you take it off of was holding pressure. You have a 2g so it is not R-12, its R134a refrigerant.
 

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gordon.cj said:
A dryer (sometimes called a receiver) takes moisture out of the system (water is very bad for a compressor since it doesn't compress). By having the hose bust out, the system has been exposed to air and the dryer will have absorbed a bunch of moisture. If it's been exposed for any length of time, it should be replaced. Not a big deal, but one additional step.

(Once exposed to air, they can't be reused. Sometimes when working on A/C you can plug it with something - maybe saran wrap - but it's a good idea to replace it anyway.)
Would this also be considered a "condensor"? (sp)
Sorry, not familiar with A/C components, as its just unneeded weight! lol:rolleyes:
 

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Nope, here are the main components of the a/c system (in order I think):
1) Compressor - big round piece of metal with a pulley attached to a belt (compresses the refrigerant from a hot, low pressure gas to a hot, high pressure gas)
2) Condenser - large square/rectangular metal grate-like piece near the front of the car (by the radiator) - air blowing over this allows the refrigerant to cool and condense into a liquid (going from a hot, high pressure gas to a cold, high pressure liquid).
3) Expansion valve - This is a small plastic piece inside the piping somewhere that causes the pressure to drop and change from cold, high pressure liquid to cold, low pressure gas.
4) Evaporator - square metal thing tucked underneath the dashboard (refrigerant entering the evaporator is cold and at low pressure - the hot air blows over the evaporator and is cooled for it to enter the car, the refrigerant absorbs the heat and leaves the evaporator as a hot, low pressure gas).
5) Receiver/Dryer (accumulator) - this is usually a metal tube (kind of like a Coke can) that usually has two hoses connected to it, both on top. It is typically mounted somewhere near the front of the car, near the compressor. As I said before, it takes moisture out of the system (right before it goes into the compressor, reducing the chances of moisture entering between the dryer and the compressor).
 
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